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Posts tagged ‘Greece’

A Parthenon Canvas Print for My Kitchen

Like most people, I take tons of photos while traveling but never display them.  While I share pictures here, if you walked around my home, you’d never think I was so passionate about art and travel.  (That is, aside from the first painting of my “art collection”.)  So when I could get canvas prints from Printcopia, I jumped at the chance.

Parthenon canvas print

An homage to the Parthenon? The canvas print and several other Mediterranean travel artifacts

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Painted Roman Statue

By traveling in Greece and Turkey, I’ve learned a lot more about Classical art and architecture.  I find myself describing the ancient sites I’ve  seen and usually slip something in about how “bright and colorful” it must have been.  That usually stops the conversation.  No one believes that ancient Greek and Roman statues were painted!  I myself am still trying to wrap my head around what that would have looked like.  But it’s true, and now I have my own photographic evidence that statues were colorful:

Painted ancient Roman general statue in Corinth

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Recycled Stone – Christianized Art in Athens

While this practice seems unthinkable today, across the Mediterranean, ancient Greek and Roman structures were salvaged for building materials in subsequent centuries.  Given the prevalence of the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages, pagan buildings were at best a curiosity.  The Parthenon in Rome is said to have only survived because it was converted into a church.

The Pentelic marble used to construct ancient Athens proved to be too alluring for Byzantine builders.  You can see blatant example of stone theft in the piece-meal construction of the 13th century Panagia Gorgoepikoos Church in Athens.  While the materials were stolen, the care with which pieces were selected and incorporated suggests some appreciation for classical art.

Panagia Gorgoepikoos, Athens

13th Century Panagia Gorgoepikoos (The Madonna who Quickly Hears) Church, Athens (Image adapted from the web)

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Images of Nike (the Goddess, not the shoes)

In honor of the opening of the Olympics today, I’ve picked out three of my favorite images of Nike from the ancient Mediterranean.  I’ve always been amused by the iconography of the Goddess Nike – flying off in a flurry or racing away, arms and legs shown mid-stride.

Athens Agora Nike

Classical Greek Nike from the Ancient Agora in Athens

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The Mycenae Archaeological Site

Mycenae wall

Mycenae outer wall viewed from below (Photo: Daydream Tourist)

Don’t go to Mycenae if you want classical Greek architecture.  It does not have elegant ionic columns or passionate friezes of Gods battling.  It is not sophisticated artistically but still worth the trip.  You visit Mycenae because it is a fortress so impressive and old that is was selected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  (And #6 in my series.)

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