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Posts tagged ‘nature’

Sculpting with Glass: The Chihuly Garden and Glass in Seattle

A few years ago I had the opportunity in Boston to see a traveling exhibit of Dale Chihuly’s glass installations while they awaited construction of their permanent home in Seattle.  I’m really fascinated by how Chihuly’s conceptualizes and builds his pieces and so I was excited to see these works this December at the Seattle Center in the completed Chihuly Garden and Glass.

Layers in a sea of Chihuly glass

Layers of brilliant glass in the “Mille Fiori” exhbit

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Photo of the Week – A Capitol Autumn

I was down at the National Gallery of Art this weekend to see Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections (more on that later…) and saw this incredible view of the Fall foliage and the juxtaposed with brilliant white Capitol building.

US capitol, autumn leaves

There were a few clouds that kept casting interesting shadows alternatively between the trees and the Capitol building.  I also love this view down Pennsylvania Ave; its so dramatic.

Dumbarton Oaks Gardens

I am spoiled in Washington D.C. with wonderful, free museums that I can visit on a regular basis. (Current government shut down not withstanding!)  So for Museum Day last Saturday, I visited the smaller Dumbarton Oaks Gardens.  Since we had some pleasant late summer weather, I thought I would show you around the grounds and take a look a the current contemporary art installation there.

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Millasis’s Pre-Raphaelite Ophelia Up Close

The monthly ArtSmart Roundtable brings together some of the best art-focused travel blogs who all post on a common theme.  This month we are discussing great paintings!  Below are links to the rest of the group’s posts this month.  I’m curious to see what everyone picked!

John Everett Millais, "Ophelia", Tate Gallery, London

John Everett Millais, “Ophelia”, 1851-1852, Tate Gallery, London

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Van Gogh and the Olive Tree

olive tree in Greece

It wasn’t until I visited Greece a few years ago that I really got a good look at live olive trees.  Despite being an agricultural powerhouse, the trunk of the olive tree is twisted and deeply etched.  The foliage is expansive but not dense.  In the shade, the bark and leaves appear to have grey-blue undertones.  These are visually interesting, complex and very hardy looking trees.  With a new found appreciation for these Mediterranean wonders, a huge light-bulb went off at the (abridged) Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.  The olive tree was possibly the best subject in the natural world for Vincent van Gogh and has resulted in some of my new favorite paintings in this catalog.

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